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Structure of Lean in Sales

When Applying Lean to Sales and Marketing many companies try to use traditional approaches and use the typical segmentation strategy. I like to organize the Structure of Lean in sales through the path of SDCA, PDCA  and EDCA. This is a quick summary for part of a webinar, I did for Lean Frontiers the other week. They will be uploading the webinar on their website.

Marketing with PDCA (More Info): Targeting what your Customer Values at each stage of the cycle will increase your ability to deliver quicker, more accurately and with better value than your competitor. It is a moving target and the principles of Lean and PDCA facilitates the journey to Customer Value.

Sales Relations Card

Do you carry a card around with you as a reminder? For many years, like 20 or so, I carried around a card clipped out of the book “Yes” or “No”: The Guide to Better Decisions  by Spencer Johnson. for those that do not recognize the name he co-authored The One Minute Manager with Ken Blanchard. The card served as a reminder and though, in the last 10 years, I doubt that I removed it very often, but it was always there.

I assume that was how the Training Within Industries pocket cards were and still to this day used. I have them on a Mobile App downloaded to my phone and refer to them often. The one that I refer to most often is the Job Relations Card. Recently, I did a podcast with  Oscar Roche,  Director of Training Within Industry Institute in Australia where we discussed Job Relations in great detail, Related Podcast and Transcription: The People Side of TWI.

The key to having a pocket card or an app is to give you a reminder of the key details. In the Job Relations example, one side of the card reminds of the Foundations for Good Relations and the other side on How to Handle A Problem.   In the sales arena, I think having a pocket card, an app is not all that bad of an idea. Even on the phone I am often reminded of how to get back on track when I observe my pocket cards pinned up next to me.  Below is a very simple attempt of taking the TWI Job Relations Pocket Card and turning it into a sales tool.


 SALES RELATIONS CARD

 A salesperson gets results through people
 FOUNDATIONS FOR GOOD RELATIONS

Understand What each customer is doing

  • Figure out what they expect from you
  • Point out ways for them to improve on what they are doing

 Give credit when credit is due

  • Recognize extra or unusual performance
  • Tell them while “it’s hot”

Tell people in advance about changes that will affect them

  • Tell them WHY if possible
  • Get them to accept the change

 Make the best use of each person’s ability

  • Look for ability not now being used
  • Never stand in a person’s way, it’s their decision

 People must be treated as Individuals


HOW HANDLE A SALES CALL

DETERMINE MUTUAL OBJECTIVES

GET THE FACTS

  • Know the status
  • Find out what procedures and behaviors apply
  • Talk with individuals concerned
  • Get opinions and feelings

Be sure to have the whole story

 WEIGH AND DECIDE

  • Fit the facts together
  • Consider their bearing on each other
  • What possible actions are there?
  • Check practices and policies
  • Consider objective and effect on individual, group and your own operations.

Don’t jump to conclusions

 TAKE ACTION

  • Are you going to handle this yourself?
  • Do you need help in handling?
  • Should you refer this to your supervisor?
  • Watch the timing of your actions

Don’t shirk responsibility

CHECK RESULTS

  • How soon will you follow up?
  • How often will you need to check?
  • Watch for changes in output, attitudes, and relationships.

Did my action help my customer?

 Were mutual objectives accomplished?


I have been playing around with this a bit and believe I need to turn it into more of a learning opportunity. However, I thought it needed to be put on the table for others to see. What are your thoughts? What things could be added?

View the original Job Relations Card

 Marketing with PDCA (More Info): Targeting what your Customer Values at each stage of the cycle will increase your ability to deliver quicker, more accurately and with better value than your competitor. It is a moving target and the principles of Lean and PDCA facilitates the journey to Customer Value.

Startup Training at Purdue

Juliana Casavan is a Training Manager at Purdue Foundry where she creates and facilitates workshops that Casavanconcentrate on the first step of looking at a business and helping them identify their value proposition. Purdue Foundry is a hub to transform innovators into entrepreneurs. It is a place that Purdue faculty, staff and students find fast, effective ways to move their ideas to the marketplace. The Foundry focuses Purdue’s vast resources to accelerate and improve advancement of Purdue ideas and innovations that are changing the world.

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Lean Sales and Marketing: Learn about using CAP-Do

Lean Engagement Team (More Info)

How Important is a Brand for a Startup?

Joe: Well, in a startup world, where you’re kind of always marketing towards customer development and product market fit and, we stay pretty focused in that. Is there an ‘Aha’ moment for a company or a time when we start shifting gears and start thinking about their brand?

Laurel Mintz: I think that that’s a conversation you should be having in the very beginning. There’s a couple of things that we find as an agency are really non-negotiables and developing a brand is definitely one of those because it’s the first impression that any consumer or client has about your company, and you want to make sure that that evokes the right kind of message. So, we have a lot of our companies go out and do kind of some brand building exercises where they come up with adjectives and descriptors and wave that they want their brand to come across and the feelings and the emotions behind the look and feel of their brand. And, I also think that the word brand is kind of muddled in the marketing conversation, so it’s important that people understand the difference.

Joe: So, it’s difficult to shift a brand, isn’t it, can a startup really know what their brand is?  Do they have to know what it is?

Laurel: I think it’s important to understand the brand or at least what you want the brand to be initially. But, I think the beauty of the startup world is that you can pivot so quickly when you’re a small, nimble company that’s the beauty in it, is that you are out there experiencing the world reflected through your brand and your company and if you see some things working or some things not, you know, a good leader in a startup or even in an emerging company knows how to pivot the message and the brand quickly.

Joe: Does the marketing guy sit on the back side roll his eyes when that’s going on because he’s got all his energy and time developing a brand, and he’s like ‘Okay’?

Laurel: Well, I think, I guess my question to you is ‘what do you think a brand is’. So, is a brand to you the overall entire look and feel or is a brand something bigger in your mind?

Joe: Well, I think that brand incorporates the vision a little bit, doesn’t it? I mean it’s the look and the feel but it’s who I want to be and who I want my customers to be.

Laurel: I think that is exactly right, and I think that a brand, the look and feel of the logo, for example, can remain the same even if the market is shifting. So, I think when it comes to pivoting for a startup, for example, it’s about shifting the messaging and the targeting in terms of where your dollar spend is going for marketing rather than changing the brand itself. Does that make sense?

Related Podcast and Transcription: A Marketing Conversation with Mintz

Laurel Mintz, CEO of Elevate My Brand is a renowned marketing professional with both an MBA and JD. Her company works with global brands such as Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Nestle, and Popchips. She’s an expert on everything marketing, digital strategy, social media, and events.

Marketing with PDCA (More Info): Targeting what your Customer Values at each stage of the cycle will increase your ability to deliver quicker, more accurately and with better value than your competitor. It is a moving target and the principles of Lean and PDCA facilitates the journey to Customer Value.

Establishing the Target Condition

This 7-part video series with Brandon Brown on the Toyota Kata was a lot of fun for me. It allow me to discuss some of the finer points of the Toyota Kata versus staying at the 20,ooo foot level. This particular video, Establishing the Target Condition is an example of the depth that we explored in the remaining videos. This is based on Mike Rother’s work on the subject of Toyota Kata. Toyota Kata is documented in his book Toyota Kata: Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior Results.

The series will consist of these videos:

  1. What is Toyota Kata
  2. Using Kata for Alignment
  3. Establishing Target Conditions
  4. Picking the Obstacle to Overcome
  5. Overcoming the Unmovable Obstacle
  6. The Coaching Kata
  7. Putting the Kata to Action

Brandon Brown delivers tangible and sustainable continuous improvement results as a Toyota Kata Coach and Lean Instructor/Facilitator as an Associate for the W3 Group. Since 2006, Brandon has been a Professor of Operations Management at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville teaching courses in the Industrial Engineering department such as Lean Production and Leadership Principles and Practices for the Master of Science in Operations Management degree program. Brandon is a Southeast Region Board Member for the of the Association for Manufacturing Excellence. He is also a Certified John Maxwell Coach, Teacher, and Speaker.

Marketing with PDCA (More Info)

Targeting what your Customer Values at each stage of the cycle will increase your ability to deliver quicker, more accurately and with better value than your competitor. It is a moving target and the principles of Lean and PDCA facilitates the journey to Customer Value.

Where Learning Becomes Doing: Purdue Foundry

Purdue Foundry is a hub to transform innovators into entrepreneurs. It is a place that Purdue faculty, staff and students find fast, effective ways to move their ideas to the marketplace. The Foundry focuses Purdue’s vast resources to accelerate and improve advancement of Purdue ideas and innovations that are changing the world. My podcast guest next week is Juliana Casavan a Training Manager at Purdue Foundry where she creates and facilitates workshops that concentrate on first step of looking at a business and helping them identify their value proposition.

Excerpt from next week’s podcast:

Joe:   We’re all familiar with the software and Apps guys, and with those being developed using the Business Model Canvas and Lean Startup. I think most of us get that, we see how that’s developed. But you discussed some things where the idea is like five years, six years out of trying to prove some of this technology, that to me seems very challenging.

Juliana Casavan: Yes, it is. To me, it’s one of the coolest parts of the jobs because I get to see these technologies that won’t be the market for however long it takes them to get through FDA approval. It’s kind of an 8 to 12 year trajectory for FDA approval most of the time, I kind of get to see these things like super early when they’re just at the lab bench coming up with their proof of concepts kind of phase. It does create a challenge for us because the runway is so long, so as far as how long they stay with us or the client and the customer, is very much extended because we work with them through that entire process.

I find that the core principles Lean Launch and business model canvas, the methodology still applies though. They need to get an understanding of the industry and how does the industry operate in their sciences. If they have a cancer therapeutic, they need to understand how Merck, and Pfizer and Eli Lilly actually make these decisions about who they’re going to acquire or how long are they going to wait to actually do an acquisition, what are they looking to see with the technology before they would be willing to start having those conversations.

We really get to kind of see the early phases of that and the early developments and we start conversations obviously much earlier in that industry than we do with the software and Apps because that’s very quick to the iteration.

Joe:   The main difference, it’s a much longer program, do you take a different type of ramp, a different type of acceleration with something that extends that far out?

Juliana: No, we really don’t. Actually the approach is very much the same. They go through the LaunchBox program, still just the same 6-weeks program, and again it provides some kind of orientation to the world of business and commercializing their technology versus publishing a paper about a finding kind of thing. Then they go the entrepreneur and residents just as they did before, and the entrepreneur and residents just works with them for a longer period of time. It’s pretty much what happens.

We really look for more funding for them. We know that the software and App companies need funding as well but the high sciences where we’re talking about hundreds of millions of dollars of investments before they actually even gain their first revenue kind of situation. It’s just more preparing them for that kind of value depth with funding and making sure that we’re filling it in and providing them the resources that they need.

Marketing with PDCA (More Info): Targeting what your Customer Values at each stage of the cycle will increase your ability to deliver quicker, more accurately and with better value than your competitor. It is a moving target and the principles of Lean and PDCA facilitates the journey to Customer Value.

 

Brand Marketing with Mintz

Laurel Mintz, CEO of Elevate My Brand has built a career that blends her deep personal passion for food, wine and lifestyle with considerable Laurel Mintzbusiness acumen and legal expertise. Her love of food and wine began during her college years in Santa Barbara, pouring wines and producing events for Geisinger Winery.

Laurel then moved east to attend Rutgers University, where she received both her J.D. and M.B.A. and began to expand her taste buds nationally.

Laurel is a renowned marketing professional with both an MBA and JD. Her company works with global brands such as Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Nestle, and Popchips. She’s an expert on everything marketing, digital strategy, social media, and events.

Download MP3

Business901 iTunes Store

Mobile Version

Android APP

Lean Sales and Marketing: Learn about using CAP-Do

Lean Engagement Team (More Info)